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Hurricane Season Travel

rainy season mudslide in Costa Rica
Traveling during the off season can cost a lot less than peak, but it does come with its risks. Off season in most places means a risk (or certainty) of inclement weather: snow, rain, extreme temperature, etc.  In the northern Atlantic, this equals hurricanes.

Mum and I travel during hurricane season all the time. Fall temperatures that are still warm without being too hot and fewer tourists due to families working within the confines of school schedules are extremely enticing. In all the times we’ve been traveling together, weather has not derailed our plans. In fact, NOAA has calculated the the probability of a hurricane eye hitting Miami in any given year as 4%. With a risk that low, why not?

hurricane damage on abandoned hotel in the Dominican Republic
2017 is abnormal, to say the least, with a record number of category 3 or higher storms in the Atlantic.  We have been planning an October trip to Puerto Rico since May and are watching all of the activity closely. The eye of category 3 Hurricane Irma passed off shore, but the impact of the winds caused damage. With Hurricane Maria’s category 4 eye passing right over the island (the strongest to hit in nearly a century), the extent is currently unknown but certainly significant. Like much of the Caribbean, tourism is integral to the economy of Puerto Rico. After Irma, our plan was to still visit the island bringing both our tourism dollars and some supplies for local residents that may assist with everyday life. Maria has changed that. Of utmost importance is the lives of the people who call Puerto Rico home. Necessities of everyday life and infrastructure repairs must be the focus for residents; tourism cannot distract from that.

With all of this in mind, Mum and I are currently considering changing our plans. Is it better to continue on and bring our tourism dollars and donations to the island, or are we more of a hinderance than a help? What’s the best course of action as a potential visitor to an area that had a recent weather disaster?

All we can do is keep watching the storms and hoping that those who call these beautiful islands home are safe and well.

Sunset in the Exumas
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Experience Eclipse 2017 in Charleston, SC

Planning to live in the “Dark Side of the Moon” for a couple of minutes? Interested in the “Moonshadow” live?

If you’re planning on taking a trip to a U.S. city, to take part in the once-in-a-lifetime total solar eclipse experience, consider communities surrounding larger cities. Charleston is awesome. But, several communities surrounding Charleston, SC may be an easier bet to reach, to hunker in, and to explore. Among the sweetest is the Town of Summerville.

It’s estimated that, conservatively, the greater Charleston area will host between 60,000-80,000 visitors. Yet there have been several reports estimating over a million. According to College of Charleston Physics Professor, Dr. Chris Fragile, “This will be the most viewed eclipse in human history.” The South Carolina coast is the final place to view the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse before it heads out to cast the moon’s shadow onto the Atlantic Ocean.

The last coast-to-coast total eclipse to traverse North America was 99 years ago, in 1918. The next time the phenomonen of a total eclipse crossing our continent will occur is 35 years from now, in 2052. Why so seldom? The moon orbits at a five degree tilt. The earth and sun each spin on a separate axis. And, let’s face it; 70% of the earth is ocean, so our waters are much more likely to experience a total eclipse than we are.

HOW TO PREPARE:

Get Special Eye Protection

One cannot look directly into the sun on any occasion, and partial blockage of the sun does not affect its intensity, nor affect the ability to prevent eye damage. Sunglasses with UV protection will simply not cut it this time. Unless you have a welder’s shield collecting dust in your garage, you’ll need to invest a buck or two in a pair of eclipse glasses. When you wear a pair of eclipse glasses in a lit room, they will block out all light. Put them on to watch the sun and moon converge. Wear them, looking directly at the sun safely, to view the eclipse until totality. Only then, will you be able to remove the glasses briefly, to see the outer glow. Once the sun begins to once again emerge, you’ll need to don the glasses until you’re ready to, again, view the rest of the world around you.

You may also be fortunate enough to see “shadow bands,” explains Dr. Fragile. “They’re similar to the funny, squiggly shadows that appear at the bottom of the swimming pool,” he says. He suggests laying a white bedsheet on the ground to best view shadow bands.

Defer to your iPhone Camera

The amount of heat entering the lens and body of your 35mm SLR camera may be damaging. But iPhone cameras are designed to adjust to the amount of ambient light, making it safe to use. It may be time to purchase an iPhone tripod, or determine how to securely attach your selfie stick to your tripod.

Even through a telescope, a dense mylar filer is a necessity.

Plan for Chilly Weather

Yes, on August 21st, you are heading directly into the scorching summer heat of South Carolina. But you will need to pack a few items to keep you warm. During a total eclipse, the temperature will drop and the winds may pick up. Charleston Southern University Professor of math and physics, Dr. Fred Worthy, says that he experienced a partial eclipse during which the temperature plummeted by 30 degrees.

Escape the Crowded Interstate by Checking Out a Surrounding Community

I’m biased, because I lived in Summerville, S.C. for 12 years, and it remains my “home,” whether or not I live there. Totality  in Summerville will be experienced for between one minute and 40 seconds to two minutes. For additional eclipse stats, check out this link.  Summerville Dream has a great microsite highlighting the Eclipse happenings around Summerville. And, Colonial Dorchester State Historic Site will host events throught the weekend preceding the Eclipse. Check out the lineup at… http://southcarolinaparks.com/products/10004632

Summerville, S.C., The Birthplace of Sweet Tea, may be easier to access, because of its proximity to I-26, the main conduit into Charleston. One you’re settled in Summerville, check out the many things to do in the area both before and after the eclipse. Go to VisitSummerville.com to research and pre-plan your extra time. Visit private merchants in and around the quaint town square reminiscent of small southern towns, indulge in a game of golf, or take a walking tour of the town’s permanent sculpture collection – plus find Sculpture in the South’s more than twenty life-sized bronzes of birds perched on balconies, windowsills, shop signs and rooftops.

Also check out Summerville DREAM, the Summerville Visitor’s Center and Greater Summerville/Dorchester County Chamber of Commerce at 402 N. Main Street for recommendations on events, restaurants, or even that emergency auto mechanic you are not pre-planning to meet.

Buy the T-Shirt! The Greater Summerville/Dorchester Chamber of Commerce is selling a “totality awesome” glow-in-the dark T-Shirt. And a portion of the proceeds benefit the organization’s scholarship fund. You can pre-order your shirt and pick up at the Chamber – or stop in to purchase in person.

Need more information on visiting South Carolina? Check out  http://discoversouthcarolina.com/products/52.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Send Letters to the Universe

Consider something like this….

Dear Mother Nature,
Please do not send cloud cover on August 21, 2017!
With all due respect,
Mum

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Riding in Cars with Dogs

There’s nothing like a good road trip. Add a dog and you’ve got a recipe for a great weekend escape.  I travel with my dog Hondo as often as I’m able to, now 6 different US states in our 4 years together.  I feel that its easier to travel with him by car than airplane and always try to bring him along. While it does add more prep work (and planning stress) it’s totally worth it.

5 Tips for Taking Your Dog on a Road Trip

Safety First – When you’re driving down the road, your little beast should be as safely secured as you are. Keep your dog in a crate or seat belted in. Hondo’s harness is attached to a seatbelt in a car, assuring that he doesn’t go sliding if I need to hit the brakes fast. You can find a seatbelt attachment at pet stores.

Take Breaks – When you’re on a good stretch it can be tempting to keep driving for hour after hour. Try and break that habit and make regular stops along your route for rest breaks, snacks, and a little walk. everyone will be much happier (trust me)

Keep to a Routine – Dogs like routines. They seem to instinctively know when dinner time rolls around. While it’s not always 100% possible, I try to stay to our established routines on the road. It makes the change in scenery a little less stressful for Hondo.

Be Aware of Temperature – The heat and sun are amplified inside of a car and can easily become dangerous to all living beings. When you’re road tripping make every attempt to NOT leave your dog unattended in the car.  If you absolutely have to leave them, make sure to limit the time and take steps to regulate the temperate and airflow. On solo trips in the summer when I need to make an emergency relief stop where dogs aren’t allowed, I’ll  leave the car running with the air conditioner on and doors locked.

Be Well Supplied – There’s no guarantee that you’ll be able to buy what you need for your dog when you’re away from home. Make sure that you being everything you might need with you

  • food & treats
  • dog poo bags
  • leash, harness, etc
  • crate & blanket
  • favorite toys
  • bowls for food & water

 

Do you have a tip for car trips with Dogs? Tell us in the comments!

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10 Insider Tips Driving Luggage Choice

When I was embarrassed enough to want to keep my suitcase in the car, rather than bring it into my host’s home, I knew it was time to let go of old baggage – literally. But the plethora of options is so overwhelming, the experience had me procrastinating as badly as when I am forced into the market to buy a car.

With humiliation as my motivator, I engaged on the hunt for the perfect-for-now set of two bags. What makes a bag perfect for now? Just like car shopping, everyone has different preferences that drive their decision. Below are the top ten considerations that drove my selection process.

  1. Time to try a hard shell case. The soft case that served as a cat hammock under my bed is history. The hair is no longer 100% removable, and I’m done expending the energy attempting to get “most of it” off. How efficient is keeping my bag half-packed, if I have to use 50 sheets of a new lint roller refill each time I choose to grab and go?
  2. I’m thrifty, so price is important. I travel enough to justify new bags here and there, so investing a fortune in bags is not on my radar. Li and I constantly ask ourselves, “Would I rather buy this or relax with an umbrella drink on a tropical beach?” The lure of the umbrella drink protects our wallets long enough to savor “experiences” over “stuff.”
  3. Brand matters. When inspecting quality, off brands just don’t measure up to proven standard brands. Luxury brands catch my eye, but I just can’t go there. While leather Gucci bags are enticing, I have just purchased yet another Samsonite duo. While I didn’t set out to be brand loyal, I tend to lean toward Samsonite. For some reason, I have chosen Samsonite for nearly 40 years. (Mental note: Buy Samsonite stock.)
  4. Don’t risk a cheap zipper. Poor zipper quality and construction are instant deal-breakers. I’d be mortified to have my suitcase spill my secrets onto the floor of an airport.
  5. Inspect the gusset fabric. Most bags tend to have a zippered gusset that allows me to bring more home than I left with. Close inspection revels that the weave is not as tight on bargain bags, thus less durable. While I do pack clothing with the intention of leaving it behind for the maids and their families, I still somehow need to unzip and make room for more wine, coffee, and art on my return flight (Pack Rat, Will Travel). Cheap gusset fabric is simply risky.
  6. Test the height of the fully extended telescopic pull. I have long legs, and hunching over to pull my bag through an airport is agony. I learned this the hard way, traveling to Europe with a too short bag and no chiropractor to save me.
  7. The lighter the better. The best thing about ditching my old bags is knowing that I will never have to lift that carry-on into the overhead again in my life. While many times a male hero steps in to help, I have struggled with first hoisting the bag to my seat back (while still in an upright position), then transferring it to the to the top of my head to get it just one more “oomph” into the overhead.
  8. Find wheels that glide like a Hot Wheels car on a twisty track. I drag bags around the store to check wheel bearings. I inspect the way they are attached to the suitcase. Heavy duty rivets – check! My luggage gets dragged over some rocky terrain, and the wheels had better not fail my sense of adventure. 360° rotation is a must. It’s for this reason I chose not to order online; I opted to peruse every Marshalls, TJ Maxx, Ross and Burlington Coat Factory in a 30 mile radius. For the record, Burlington Coat Factory’s discounted prices were typically $10 less per bag on exact same brands and features. (Colors were different in every single store.)
  9. Interior dividers help keep me organized.  I keep my carry-on pre-packed, under my bed, awaiting our next escape. It helps me to have my smaller items like travel make-up and toiletries, a mini-curling iron, and a small first-aid kit ready to go. Check out my Top 10 Must Pack Items to learn more about packing.
  10. Color does count. Gone are the days I just want my suitcase to blend in. I just won’t buy black bags. I now prefer to spot my bags from a mile away, and know that any thief wouldn’t dare drag noticeably colorful bags off the carousel and out the door.  Yet, as I previously blogged about how much I want to outsmart thieves, I do not want to drag UGLY through the airport. And I am reasonably sure I would tire of a print – so a bright solid it is. My previous big bag for check-in, under the cat hair, was red. My carry-on was kinda purple. This time I struggled over blue and silver, before settling on the blue. It was not until I rolled my bags toward the cash register that I realized they are not just any blue; they are MeetUatGate.com blue!

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Long-Haul Flight Survival Tips

Nobody enjoys the dreaded long haul flight. They’re uncomfortable, awkward, and the bane of many a traveler. I’m used to 5 to 7 hour flights, but my 35+ hour economy class odyssey from Atlanta to Phnom Penh was an entirely different adventure. Below are a few tips for making your next long-haul flight as smooth as possible

Seat Selection – can make all the difference. As I planned on sleeping for at least half of the trans-pacific leg I picked a window seat on the side of the airplane that mirrored my preferred side of the bed so that I could lean into  the wall. This also meant that the other passengers in the row didn’t have to wake me when they needed to move.

Entertainment – is key. Check the airline rules carefully, because your US domestic preparations might not work. The electronics ban on flights from some countries to the US means that you can’t rely on your tablet or laptop for distraction. Additionally, Chinese regulations do not allow the use of “airplane mode” on your smart device, so all phones must by powered off for the entire flight. Two women were jailed recently for failure to comply, so no sneaking around. Many airplanes do have touch screen entertainment centers for each seat, like my Chinese Eastern Airlines flight, fully loaded with movies, music, and games. Your old mp3 player may be allowed, as long as it doesn’t have a cellular data option. I’m a knitter so I always bring some yarn and a pair of needles. Right now, most airlines allow knitting needles, but I’d recommend sticking to a wooden option.  Also, never underestimate the power of a good book. A few cheap paperbacks from a second-hand store are my weapon of choice, as they can be easily left behind for others to read and enjoy.

Snacks – can be a lifesaver. Even if your flight includes a meal service you can never be sure of what you might get. This is doubly true if you have allergies or any diet restrictions. Pre-packaged snacks are a safe option which insures that you’ll always have something to eat when you need it. I do like fruit when I travel, but you’re not always allowed to bring fresh produce with you when you travel internationally – even in your carry-on. I opt for granola or protein bars, nuts, and raisins.

Sleep – is a necessity for changing time zones. I don’t sleep easily on flights, but even a short nap is invaluable for a clear head with international layovers and flight changes. This past trip was my first time using melatonin and now I’m a believer. This in combination with my eye mask and earplugs were a necessity. Travel pillows or neck style pillows aren’t just for heads. I like to place mine in my lower back area for comfort and mum enjoys hers under her knees for bit of an angle. There’s also a lot to be said for having a blanket or scarf you can use as a cover. I like to pull mind up over my head to help block out light and its a visual cue to the cabin crew not to bother me (just make sure the seatbelt is on the outside).

Cleaning Up – can make all the difference. Face wipes, lotion, and tooth-brush and toothpaste in my carry on gave me the option to impersonate my normal evening and morning routines.  Just being able to wipe the re-circulated air off my face and bush my teeth was more relaxing than I could have imagined. A post-nap cleaning was refreshing and I arrived at my destination feeling less dirty than I typically do.

Easy Carry-On List for a Smoother Long-Haul Flight

  • head phones/ear buds
  • paper books/magazines
  • snacks
  • melatonin
  • travel pillow/neck pillow
  • eye mask
  • blanket/pashmina/large scarf
  • tooth-brush & toothpaste
  • pre-moistened face wipes
  • lotion for face & hands

Do you have any tips for long flights? Share it with us!

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7 Tips for Visting Cambodia

If you’re planning a trip to Cambodia, here are a few things I learned during my visit that might help you!

Cash is King – and the US dollar is everywhere.  Apart from the airport or the Villa Paradiso, its hard to find anyone who will accept your card. Many hotels, restaurants, and shops will only accept payment in cash. While the official national currency is the riel, most prices are posted in US dollars and change will be given in both paper varieties. If you are running low, many ATMs will dispense US dollars. On islands like Koh Rong Sanloem, only cash is accepted and there are no banks or ATMs.

Remove Your Shoes – when you enter a private home, religious space, and some businesses. Even on the  islands I needed to take my shoes off before entering any of the huts or public spaces. My sandals had an ankle strap, and if I had it to do over, I’d get something that was easier to slip on and off.

English is Everywhere – but don’t assume everyone speaks it. The majority of people you come across seem to speak a few words in english (numbers, basic pleasantries, etc), but you quickly learn that doesn’t mean you can communicate. The very few words I learned in Khmer were invaluable for getting around and bargaining. If you can only remember one, make it thank you. An “Awe Koon” goes a long way.

Bring  your Northern European 2 prong plug adaptor – because the one marked for Asia region won’t work. As a former french colony, the European influence hasn’t completely disappeared. Besides architecture from years gone by, the electric system uses round 2 prong plugs and not the flat 3 prong plugs you’ll find in other neighboring countries.

overheated? coconut water is nature’s gatorade

Drink Water – even when you think you’re not thirsty. The heat and humidity in southeast Asia are no joke. Bottled water is easy to get and inexpensive. Alternately, go for what the locals drink: count water or sugar cane juice. You can find carts all over offering these specialties for $1 or less. I didn’t even realize until I got back that I spent the entire week at least partially dehydrated.

A Scarf or pashmina  – is the national accessory. You’ll see plenty of locals with scarfs around their necks or heads as blocking the sun actually helps you feel cooler. Both the pashmina I brought and the scarf I purchased at the Russian Market saw continuous use. They’re also good for visiting religious sites where you need to cover your shoulders.

Avoid KTV – (Karaoke Television) even if you adore karaoke. The name is deceptive, as these are largely fronts for sex tourism. They’re only open at night and I passed many on way to the airport. Girls dressed to sell were sitting in red plastic chairs in the entrance waiting to be chosen by an incoming customer. If you absolutely need to sing along to your favorite Styx song, do it in your hotel.

Did I miss something? Share your tips in the comments below!

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Night Layover in Nanning

When I first booked my flight to Cambodia, a scheduled 10 hour layover in Nanning, China gave me some pause. I knew nothing about the city nor what I might encounter during my flight change.  Guidebooks and internet resources describe this “small city” of 2 million people as a train stop en-route to Vietnam and tout waterfalls and historic areas outside of town.  As I was due to arrive after midnight, none of this was very informative for me.

My domestic Shanghai Airlines flight was the last arrival of the day.  The small, mostly regional airport closed soon after, with all the lights shutting down and the only staff a cleaning person or two. The doors were propped open, and people were stay inside near the baggage claim, but the heating was turned off and the metal benches were separated by armrests. I took a deep breath and decided to head into town. In the daytime there is a bus you can take to the train station near downtown, but after 11p it’s taxi only.

entrance to the Nanning night market

The taxi driver who flagged me spoke no English (and I speak no Mandarin), but we did manage to communicate through a translation app on his mobile phone, which we passed back and forth. He named an over-priced night rate of 160 CNY, which I accepted (note – next time, haggle!). The 45 minute trip from the airport seemed to fly as he sped around lorries with no regard to speed limit signs or lanes in the road. I had previously read about the Night Market in downtown and decided that could be a place to explore a bit. By the time I got there at 2am on a Thursday morning, the market was about 1/3 open. Restaurants were sweeping trash into piles in the middle of the street and a few locals were stumbling out to catch a ride home.  I walked around the few remaining stalls with seafood on sticks, tofu noodle bowls, and fruits before deciding to venture a little further.  A few blocks through tall, modern concrete buildings leads you to the Yongjiang river. Along the side is a lovely, clean, well manicured park.  Everything was silent and empty.

NNG from the taxi

By 4am I gave up and took a taxi back to the airport, the return trip costing night rate of 116 CNY. This driver didn’t have a translation app, but thankfully I had written down the word “airport” on a post-it note, which did the trick (after he corrected my pronunciation). The first domestic flight out of Nanning is around 7am.  Using my western standards, I assumed the airport would officially re-open 2 hours before. Instead, I walked in circled in the dark airport until the lights turned on at 5:45am and the first check-in counter opened at 6.  My international flight to Phnom Penh at 10am didn’t open for check-in until 9. (side note: I’ve never been so happy to be traveling with only my backpack.)

Lesson learned: if you’re going to have a layover in Nanning, aim for the daytime. The city looked lovely and I hope I get a chance to see it in full glory in the future.

 

bridge across the Yongjiang river

 

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Prepping for Cambodia

Snorkling friends at Disney’s Typhoon Lagoon, 1995

When an old friend S got a job in Cambodia, I knew I needed to visit her. We’ve known each other since second grade and (rare for me) kept in touch through the years. She has a curious spirit like me, exploring different countries, always excited to learn more. We went to Girl Scout camp together in the 90s, but this will be the first time we’ve had this kind of adventure together.  Needless to say, I’m more than a bit excited.

I’ve completed my necessary travel vaccinations and got my Visa ahead of time, so now, at one week away, its time for final preparations. While I’m used to traveling for a week using only a carry-on,  that’s been on flights under five hours to countries where anything forgotten can be easily picked up. Planning for more  than 40hrs of travel time to a developing country leads to a few changes in my packing list.

For the plane ride I’m wearing some soft trousers, a cotton tee, a light hoodie, sneakers, a jacket, and a scarf.  Layering these items should keep me warm on the flight as well as during my looooooong layover in China where the weather will be cooler.

  • 2 tank tops
  • 3 short sleeve shirts
  • 1 long sleeve shirt (for temples and other places with conservative dress codes)
  • long maxi-skirt
  • light-weight capris
  • pj shorts
  • swim suit
  • 7 pairs knickers and a spare bra
  • 3 pairs socks
  • sandals
  • first aid kit with plenty of stomach medicine and bandaids
  • personal medicines (including anti-malarials)
  • toiletries
    • sunscreen, lotion, insect repellant
    • deodorant, castille soap, toothpaste
    • face cleaning wipes, tissues
    • tooth brush,  razor, hairbrush, hair ties, headband
  • umbrella and poncho
  • foldable bag & ziplock bags
  • paper-back book that I can leave behind
  • notebook & pens
  • neck pillow
  • ear plugs and eye mask
  • melatonin
  • small fast-dry towel
  • herbal teas and snack bars for the plane
  • iPod, phone, chargers, headphones
  • yarn and knitting needles
  • moneybelt
  • passport, visa, spare passport photos

Mum taught me to never go anywhere empty handed, so I’m also packing a small gift for my friend. All of this in my new, smaller 30L Osprey Porter.  Now let the count down to take-off begin!

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5 Reasons Why You (Or Your Kid) Should Study Abroad

While I was working on my undergraduate degree I decided to do a semester abroad. For me, the possibility to travel while studying was something that appealed from day one. After my experience, I never miss a chance to tell students or parents why they should think about taking advantage of the opportunity.

Packed and ready for my study abroad.

Credits Transfer – Many universities offer their own affiliated study abroad options. These programs include pre-approved classes, arranged lodging, and group incentives. They are extra convenient because credits automatically appear on your official transcript without the need for additional paperwork! My own study abroad in London was an affiliated program which made everything very easy. If your college doesn’t have their own programs, you’ll just need to apply for a credit transfer, but I do recommend checking ahead to time to make sure everything will be accepted.

Financial Aid Counts – Your FAFSA and other student aid will contribute toward the cost. Just like with credit transfer there’s a bit of paperwork, but its definitely worth it in the end. Many study abroad programs are comparable in cost to in-state tuition, so if you’re an out-of-state student like I was, this meant I paid significantly less for a semester in UK than I would have paid to study on my US campus! Additionally, if you are participating in your school’s own program, any scholarships you may have will also work toward the total cost.


Internship Opportunities
 – Some study abroad programs offer the opportunity for an internship for credit as one of their classes.  The one I participated in assisted with finding a placement related to my degree program which meant that I got work experience and a nice little line on my resume, which I believe was invaluable! My placement was unpaid, but one of my roommates received a small stipend with hers, which I know she found invaluable. School credit plus international internship equals awesome!

Live Like a Local – I shared a university arranged studio flat with two other girls from my school. We shopped at the local Tesco, took turns cooking, and made sure to give each other space when we needed “alone time.” I took public transit to class and work and learned  my way around the neighborhood. The experience taught me that I was strong, capable, and could live anywhere. By the time we left I felt completely at home in London.

Flatmates visit the Acropolis in Greece.

Adventure – The program I participated in offered a few sanctioned outings to nearby places like Bath, but every spare penny I had went to further exploration. Besides exploring the museums and parks in the city, the proximity of the UK opened up a lot of options. One of my flatmates had a friend who was doing a study abroad at the same time in Dublin and we took a trip to visit her. We also put our heads together and made trips to Greece, France, and Germany. (My flatmates also went to Italy, but I had run out of money. I’ll get there one day!)

One bonus feature would definitely be Scouting for the Future. While I was in the UK, I arranged a visit with a professor at a nearby university for a masters program I was interested in. The chance to meet with them and tour the campus is definitely why I chose to return for my advanced degree studies. I’m certain that visit is a key reason I received an International scholarship to attend that school.

A study abroad may not be for everyone, but its definitely worth a consideration. After all, where else can you get college credit and use financial aid to explore the world?

 

Have you done a study abroad? What else would you add?

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Resolved

Happy New Year!

Now, I’m not one for New Years Resolutions: the few i’ve bothered to make were destined for failure before spring. In fact, I’ve only made one that’s ever truly stuck. I suppose that’s because it’s less a matter of resolve and more a promise to myself. At the end of 2013 I decided that I would take one international trip every year.

I’ve traveled before. I did a semester abroad in the UK while working on my undergraduate degree and went back to live there for my masters, doing weekends wherever I could afford the train or flight. I even went to a Harry Potter fan conference in Canada. Maybe those experiences left me hungry, because I always want to see and learn more.

So now each year I am resolute to continue meeting the promise I made to myself three years ago: “I will travel somewhere fantastic again. And you can rely on that, Li!”

So now the question is, where to?